Saturday, December 5, 2015

THE QUICKENING--Another Free Holiday Read (Courtney McKinney-Whitaker)

I am an avid reader of holiday fiction in December. I've always wanted to write a Christmas short story, but up until this November, I never had any ideas. Then one morning in November, while I was still in bed, I realized what story I wanted to tell. And tell quickly, since I had about two weeks before the beginning of December.

If you've read my novel, THE LAST SISTER, you might remember Owen Ramsay and Amelia Williamson. I knew what happened to my main characters, Catie Blair and Malcolm Craig, but I wondered about Owen and Amelia. When I left them in the South Carolina backcountry in the middle of the Anglo-Cherokee War in June 1760, Owen was slowly recovering from a wound that still had a decent chance of killing him, and Amelia was grieving the loss of her husband and infant twins, and there was a brutal war still raging. Their road back to life would not be an easy one.

In "The Quickening: A Last Sister Short Story," the Anglo-Cherokee War has just ended and survivors Owen Ramsay and Amelia Williamson have made their way to Owen’s childhood home in the South Carolina backcountry. Join them there for Christmas 1761.

"The Quickening" is available from my website as a free digital download. If you've read THE LAST SISTER, I hope you enjoy this glimpse into the lives of two of my favorite characters. And if you haven't, I hope "The Quickening" persuades you to give the novel a try! Check it out below.



Download "The Quickening"

Click the link above or copy and paste
 http://courtneymckinneywhitaker.com/the-quickening/ 
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2 comments:

  1. I read this last night and LOVED it. I actually wasn't aware that our version of Christmas was so different than Colonial celebrations.

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  2. I'm so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, quite different. We get most of our big stuff from the Victorians, who got it from the German influence of Prince Albert and the imagination of Charles Dickens, whose influence really can't be overestimated. The power of the pen!

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